Archive for the 'Divorce and Separation' Category

Kindle Some Passion.

Holding It Together

With the overextended schedule many couples have these days, is it any wonder that no one has time for sex? Shuttling the kids to school, after school activities, working differing schedules, all of this leaves little to no time for couples to be as intimate as they were dating. Sex is the first thing to go, it seems, when everyone is tired. And sex is the superglue of marriages; when the intimacy deteriorates, everything else will as well.

You may feel too tired to put any effort into reviving a seemingly lifeless love life. But the end result will surprise you. A little extra effort on the part of one partner can go a long way. Instead of the functional goodbye kiss, why not slip a little passion into it? Surprise your partner by letting them know you really /will/ miss them. A sexy wink afterwards can only ignite wonder and a reciprocating spark.

Sneak a sexy note into their briefcase or lunch. If this is a bad idea, in case of it falling out in front of a boss, then write a sexy email and send it to your partner’s personal inbox. If they enjoy television after all the kids are in bed, grab a snack and cuddle up to them. Feed your partner little bites of the snack, because food, like sex, is a basic need and can be very sensual.

If you live in an area where you can sit and watch the heavens, try it. Spending time with your loved one under the stars can help you connect. You can find a lovely photo of a meteor and a link to information about the Persids, here. A meteor shower is something wonderful to share together. How many wishes can you both make?

You will find that if you take just a little time to do these little things, your own passion will grow.

For more ideas, take a peek at what I’ve found!

The Impact Of Intimacy

6 Tips For Keeping Spark Alive In Your Marriage, After Children

Relationship Glue

Posted in Parenting, Dating, Marriage, Sex, Divorce and Separation, Stress Management | No Comments »

New Study Suggests That Divorced Dads Can Help Keep Their Kids From Smoking

Ball State study finds that divorced dads can stop children from smoking New Study Suggests That Divorced Dads Can Help Keep Their Children From SmokingThe Centers for Disease Control estimates that about 1 million teens — about 1 in 5 — become smokers every year but a Ball State professor has found that in the case of broken homes, nonresidential fathers can play a major role in stemming this unhealthy habit.

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Chad Menning

Sociology professor Chad Menning found divorced or separated nonresidential fathers can significantly reduce their adolescent children’s chances of smoking by being a strong role model and spending more time with them.

The study found that when teens are with their fathers five times a month, including overnight stays, they experience a 30-percent reduction in the probability of starting to smoke regularly. When teens spend little or no time with their nonresident fathers, the chances of their smoking increases by 40 percent.

The study also found when nonresident fathers fail to provide support and develop a solid relationship with their sons and daughters, teens turn to their friends for advice and guidance. Teens with friends who smoked were more likely to start smoking regularly.

Menning has spent the last several years studying the impact of divorce on American families. In 2004, he found that adolescents learn to manipulate their parents following a divorce or separation, gaining more control of their situation in a two-household family.

Below is contact information for Dr. Menning and background on the study.

Background

A new Ball State University study finds that divorced or separated fathers can significantly reduce their adolescent children’s chances of smoking by being a strong role model and spending more time with them.

The findings are from a study examining the long-term impact of relationships between nonresident separated or divorced fathers and their offspring, which involved 1,932 participants from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

“Smoking is less likely if nonresident fathers spend ‘quality’ time with their children,” said Chad Menning, a sociology professor who conducted the study. “These fathers are more likely to influence their children about lifestyle habits.”

The study found that when teens are with their fathers five times a month, including overnight stays, they experience a 30-percent reduction in the probability of starting to smoke regularly. When teens spend little or no time with their nonresident fathers, the chances increase by 40 percent.

The quality of those visits also has a major impact, Menning said.

“However, we found it isn’t so much the number of times a teen spends with his or her dad, but the quality of the relationship,” he said. “This means a father must play a parental role, working on homework with their sons and daughters, or taking them to plays, museums or events. If a child feels close to his or her father, the parental influence increases tremendously when it comes to smoking.”

The study also found when nonresident fathers fail to provide support and develop a solid relationship with their sons and daughters, teens turn to their friends for advice and guidance. Teens with friends who smoked were more likely to start smoking regularly.

“This study strongly supports the notion that nonresident fathers must be involved with their children on a regular basis,” Menning said. “We’ve addressed the financial support through the courts and legislation, but divorced fathers who are involved can play a major role in helping adolescents grow into healthy adults.”

Contact Menning at clmenning@bsu.edu or (765) 285-4690.

Posted in Parenting, Alcohol and Other Drugs, Divorce and Separation | 1 Comment »

            



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