Growing An Indoor Herb Garden


By: Kate Gilby

If you live in the northern hemisphere, then it is likely that your garden is tucked up for the winter. However, this doesn't mean you can't enjoy freshly picked herbs. Many varieties will grow quite happily indoors on a sunny window ledge or porch. In addition to providing a source of fresh herbs, an indoor garden can look extremely attractive, and they are a wonderful introduction to gardening for children.

Herbs which will grow indoors:

You will need to find a sunny, well lit spot to grow your indoor herb garden. Ideally, it should be south facing, but if this isn't possible choose a situation that will receive plenty of light through out the day. Try to avoid a north facing place because it is unlikely the plants will receive enough light to grow properly.

What you will need:

Buy your herbs from reputable suppliers, don't buy seed packets which are out of date, and avoid any straggly or unhealthy looking plants. The same is true for compost, choose a good all purpose compost, your herbs will be relying on it for nutrition for some time.

The containers are easier to select. You will find a wide range at garden centers and nurseries. Alternatively, you can use ones you already have, or adapt other objects. I grow my geraniums in a old mop bucket, and my lemon mint is growing in a teapot with a broken handle.

If your children are helping with your indoor garden, a nice idea is to take some plain plant pots, and let the kids decorate them with paint, paper etc. to produce their own unique pots.

Once you have planted your garden, it will need some care. Remember, indoor plants rely on you totally. Water regularly, but be careful not to over-water, this is the main cause of death for most indoor plants. No more than once a week should be sufficient, I water once every two weeks. Check the compost before watering, if it still feels moist wait and check again the next day. If you have used a good compost, and your winter is relatively short you will probably only need to feed your plants once. If you have a longer cold season, it might be an idea to use the slow release pellets you can buy in garden centers.

© Kate Gilby 2003

Kate Gilby lives in the UK, and is the editor of kate blogs: http://kategilby.co.uk a blog devoted to writing, web and graphic design. She is also the owner of the home business portal, kate-blogs biz: http://kate-blogs.kategilby.co.uk, in addition to the home and garden sites More Than Mint: http://more-than-mint.kategilby co.uk and Decorating Divas: http://decorating-divas.kategilby.co.uk/ Her spare time is devoted to knitting fog and performing random acts of silliness.

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